Have you returned your 2020 Census? Everyone living in the United States and its five territories is required by law to be counted in the 2020 Census.

 The results of the 2020 Census will help determine how hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding flow into communities every year for the next decade. That funding shapes many different aspects of every community, no matter the size, no matter the location.

 As the U.S. Census Bureau continues to monitor the impacts COVID-19 has on 2020 Census operations, changes to operations are being deployed to ensure the safety of staff and the public while maximizing the number of households that respond on their own to the 2020 Census.

 “We are taking steps and adapting our operations to make sure everyone is counted, while keeping everyone safe,” said Census Bureau Director Dr. Steven Dillingham in a press release. “If you haven’t responded, the time to respond is now. Responding to the 2020 Census online, on paper, by phone, or in person

with a census taker, helps secure vital resources for your community.”

 Since July, Census takers have been out in communities. Census takers wear masks and follow local public health guidelines when they visit your home. All census takers complete a virtual COVID-19 training on social distancing and other health and safety protocols before beginning their work in neighborhoods.

 Census takers are hired from every area, and their goal is to help you and everyone in your home be counted in the 2020 Census. If the census taker who visits your home does not speak your language, you may request a return visit from a census taker who does speak your language.

 Census takers work between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m., including weekends. If no one is home when the census taker visits, the census taker will leave a notice of their visit with information about how to respond online, by phone or by mail. 

 If you respond online or by phone today, a census taker is less likely to have to visit your home to collect your response.

 The Census Bureau will mail an additional paper questionnaire to nonresponding households.

 The Census Bureau also is emailing households in low-responding areas. The email messages will come from 2020census@subscriptions.census.gov and will give recipients the option to opt out of receiving future messages.

 In addition to contacting households through these new methods, the Census Bureau is increasing other outreach efforts during one last push to encourage everyone to respond to the census online, by phone or by mail.

 Additionally, the Census Bureau has expanded its paid advertising, launching a series of new advertisements aimed at increasing online response.

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