Books

 With the summer heat blaring down on Michigan and the tri-county area, people flock to beaches to get refreshed in the water or they prefer to stay inside where it’s cool.

 Either way, the summer brings a new round of books to check out that can be enjoyed outside or inside.

“Burn Our Bodies Down” by Rory Power

 In this creepy thriller, Margot is tired of not knowing anything about her past. She lives with her mother and follows her scratch rules — keeping a candle lit and never asking about her family’s history. But she wants to know, and she goes to her mother’s hometown to find answers.

 Power is the New York Times bestselling author of “Wilder Girls.”

“Afterland” by Lauren Beukes

 In a world run by women after a mysterious pandemic destroyed the majority of the male population, women are desperate to keep the human race alive. The protagonist protects her son by disguising him as a girl. Danger comes when they’re hunted by an army — including the protagonist’s own sister.

 Beukes is the award-winning author of “The Shining Girls.”

“The Vanishing Half” by Brit Bennett

 Identical twin sisters, Stelle and Desiree, are born and raised in a small southern community in the 1960s. At age 16, they run away from home. They go down separate paths. Desiree returns home and raises her daughter, while Stella passes as a white woman. It’s a story of identity, race, history and perception.

 HBO won an auction between 17 bidders for the TV rights to the book in a seven-figure deal. The book is a Good Morning America Book Club Pick, Barnes & Noble June Book Club Pick, and Amazon Best Book of June. Bennett is the New York Times Best Selling Author of “The Mothers.”

“Utopia Avenue” by David Mitchell

 The book follows a psychedelic British band finding the positives and the downsides of fame in the ‘60s. It involves riots in the streets, drugs, sex, revolutions and family. Critics are expecting this one to top the charts.

 Mitchell is the award-winning author of Cloud Atlas and The Bone Clocks.

“Pizza Girl” by Jean Kyoung Frazier

 In this funny but raw story about two women in opposite stages of life, an 18-year-old pregnant pizza delivery girl struggling in

L.A. meets a middle-aged, stay-at-home mom who orders pizza for her son every week. The two main characters realized their lives intertwine in multiple ways.

“The Lightness” by Emily Temple

 Main character Olivia is trying to find her missing father and ends up at something called the Levitation Center. She joins a program with other girls who are in search of ultimate enlightenment — the ability to levitate. Dealing with physics, faith and relationships, these girls are on a journey that could end in serious danger.

 Author Emily Temple is a senior editor at Literary Hub.

“Mexican Gothic” by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

 In glamorous 1950s Mexico, the protagonist receives a letter from her newlywed cousin begging for someone to save her from a mysterious fate. She finds herself in a creepy house in the Mexican countryside, dealing with complicated familial relationships and a house that seems to be a character of its own.

“The Only Good Indians” by Stephen Graham Jones

 Four Indigenous American men want to make their own futures after a horrific childhood event puts all of their lives in danger. The cultures and traditions they grew up with follow them in weird ways in this stay-up-late-to-read horror.

 All these books can be ordered through Fenton’s Open Book by calling (810) 626-8000 or ordering online at bookshop.org, which gives a portion of proceeds to independent bookstores.

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