Here’s a tip for all the ladies out there contemplating marriage. If you want to know what kind of husband your intended will be, observe how he treats his mother. More importantly, pay close attention to how his father treats his mother, and grandmother.

Seeing that big yellow school bus facing Owen Road with the “bus drivers needed” sign at Fenton schools brings back some very fond memories, memories of my old school bus driver, John Fox.

In May, I sent away to ancestrydna.com for a DNA kit. When the kit arrived, I read the instructions and learned that I would have to spit some saliva into a little vial. Once the vial was filled, I was to shake it up, mixing it with the solution at the bottom, and send it back to ancestry in…

When I was a kid, the rhyme “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt me,” meant something. It meant something to all of us kids in grade school (what they called elementary school back in the olden days).

In this weekend’s edition, I wrote a little story about Braden Diehl, one of our valued newspaper carriers. I appreciate Braden more than he may ever know because my sons, too, were carriers when they were kids. It was their first job and they were so proud to be making their own money.

People in Fenton complain about a lot of things — the roads, the traffic, not enough of this, too much of that — it’s never-ending.

Last week, I was reading a WHMI online news story. It was about how members of one political party came up with a plan to fund Livingston County road repairs — without raising taxes.

My husband and I talked it over and we have decided that we are going to take up camping again. Both of us camped with our families when we were kids, and we took our own boys camping when they were youngsters.

 At this stage in my life there isn’t too much that I want or need. I have a great family that includes my husband, sons and a little grandson. I live in a great neighborhood with wonderful neighbors. And I have a great job that I have been saying for years I would do for free if I could afford it.

A few years ago, when our son and his fiancée lived in the Los Angeles area, my husband and I flew out there to visit with them for a week. We had a wonderful time.

While riding in my husband’s truck up Park Street in Fenton last Sunday, the road was so bumpy from potholes that my mind started wandering to what it must have been like in the 1800s.

With Mother’s Day coming up next Sunday, it won’t be long before I’m asked what I want, as in a gift. Honestly, having the honor and pleasure of being a mom to two sons and stepmom to another two, all of whom are adults now, is gift enough.

 A few days ago, I watched Good Morning America as I do every morning and was flabbergasted by a segment they titled “What are the new rules in a post #MeToo workplace?”

On Tuesday, April 17, we lost someone special, who in my opinion had more class and dignity than any woman in U.S. history — Barbara Bush.

Other than old age or illness, I truly believe there is another reason the elderly die when they do. They won’t be able to handle one more day of what the future has in store.

Transparency — that’s the latest “buzzword” we’ll be hearing often before the August and November elections.

 Next Saturday will mark the 10th anniversary of my mother’s passing. She died on April 7, 2008. I have been thinking a lot about her this week, not with sadness but by reminiscing and laughing over some of the things she did that I haven’t thought about in years.

 When my youngest son was in high school, he wanted to go somewhere for spring break. His dad and older brother had to work so it was just him and me.

One of my favorite conveniences as a writer for the Tri-County Times is the ability to ask my questions and receive answers via email. The benefits are many, at least in my opinion.

Normally, I have the ability to clear my head before I go to bed at night and fall asleep almost immediately after my head hits the pillow. Normally.

When my sons were in Fenton schools, they attended fifth and sixth grade at what was then called Fenton Intermediate School (FIS) in the Ellen Street Campus off Adelaide.

 Working as a Tri-County Times carrier on a walking route offers local youngsters not only a chance to earn their own money, it also gets them outside for some invigorating fresh air and exercise.

 Last weekend, my youngest son traveled to Denver, Colorado for a long snowboarding weekend with a buddy who lives there. He flew from Flint to Atlanta, Georgia, where he had a brief layover.

 Every day on the internet I see dozens of creative things made by some very talented people. I am particularly impressed with items that can be repurposed into something more useful than what it was originally intended to be.

 My co-worker Sally Rummel will be working this week on an article about “The Great Blizzard of 1978,” and will be asking readers what they remember about that storm 40 years ago. You don’t want to miss her great story to be published in our Jan. 24 Midweek edition.

 Staying warm has almost become a full-time job this week. It has been a very long time since we’ve seen temperatures dip this low. Just crawling out from under my warm quilts in the morning is an exercise in willpower. I find myself being jealous of the dog, who is still under the covers an…

 New Year’s Day, much like the first day of a school year, is a chance to start over fresh. I loved the first day of school because I could start over with fresh pencils, notebooks, folders and other cool stuff. 

 The late George Carlin (died 2008) was a legend when it came to giving thought-provoking speeches. His language was “colorful” at times, but his messages rang true, at least to me. So on this Christmas Eve, I would like to share with you the words he spoke after his wife’s passing:

 In the early 1980s, I worked at the Chicago regional office of an international courier company. One of my responsibilities was to maintain the weekly “courier calendar.”

 There was a lot of excitement around my house a couple of weeks ago, the weekend before my husband left for hunting camp. He installed my brand new kitchen faucet set, the one that has been sitting on the counter for months.

 With Thanksgiving just a few days away, I can’t help but think of one Thanksgiving Day that I will cherish always.

 On this Veterans Day weekend, I can’t help but remember another weekend nearly 10 years ago, when my stepson, Jeremy, graduated from U.S. Navy boot camp at Great Lakes Naval Air Station outside of Chicago.

 In 1987, during my second year in Michigan, I moved into a little house on Handy Lake, a small private lake in Hartland Township. 

 At lunchtime on Wednesday, I decided to shop for a few things at a store in Silver Lake Village. After I placed my bags in my car I got ready to get rid of my cart when all of a sudden, right in my ear, I hear a young man whisper, “I’ll take that.”

 One of the mini pitfalls of writing for a newspaper is that some people, including family and friends, don’t seem to understand, or forget, that I didn’t personally have anything to do with what’s going on in the story.

 Last weekend I had to have my debit card replaced. Upon checking my bank statement, I discovered there were two charges pending against my checking account. One charge was for just over $92, and the other just over $91. The charges were for some sort of skin cream.

 OK, I admit it, I snore. But I’m not that noisy. My sisters disagree, however, and will not let go of something that happened 30 years ago. 

 At the beginning of the month, I had the welcome opportunity to take 10 days off — five days for actual vacation, four weekend days and Labor Day. It was great!

 Tomorrow marks the 16th anniversary of one of the most devastating days in history, Sept. 11, 2001, the day America was attacked on its own soil by terrorists. At the end of the day, nearly 3,000 people were killed.